People who have heard deathbed confessions, what were some interesting ones?

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When I was in hospital, the guy in the bed next to me just asked to stop taking his meds as he was ready to die. Last thing I heard him say was “There’s no one waiting for me at home, so I’m going where they are.” Wasn’t really a shocking confession, just a lonely and heartbreaking one.

DanHero91

My dad had Alzheimer’s and ended up in a secure ward. He was blind and almost deaf. I was visiting him one day. He didn’t know who I was, but he started talking about me. He said I had done better than him in life and that he was proud of me. He was a quiet man IRL and never told me that when I was growing up. Looking back, he did things that my dumb ass never realised were for me. Like, when he retired his colleagues asked what he’d like as a present. He chose a scientific calculator (this was back in the 1970’s). He had no use for it. He gave it to me for university. I thought he was just passing it on, not realising that he’d asked for it with me in mind.

LactatingWolverine

Not my story but that of a hospice worker who spoke to my class. For those who don’t know, hospice is a method of end-of-life care that focuses on alleviating the emotional & physical pain of a dying person to ease their passing rather than combatting their imminent death. One of her patients was a bed-bound woman in her 90s who was generally unresponsive but had flashes of recognition & engagement. It’s hard to gauge the level to which unresponsive patients are detached from their surroundings, so they encourage family members to keep their company in hopes of soothing the patient. Now this patient was from a U.S. state that prided itself on its state university (and the university’s football team). The woman’s family had attended this university for four or five generations. During her hospice care, however, her great-granddaughter was the first in their family to decide to go to a different school—the rival state’s university, in fact. Her family was supportive of her decision but often joked about her being the “rebel” or “Judas” or what-have-you. One day, they were all sitting around the woman’s bedside, teasing the girl about her decision. Suddenly, the patient sat up, looked at her great-granddaughter, said, “Traitor,” and fucking DIED. Edit: Wow, thank you for all the awards! I’m glad y’all enjoyed the story. I heard it four years ago and I still think & laugh about it often. FWIW, the hospice worker said that the family thought it was hilarious.

scatteringbones

My grandfather had pretty terrible dementia and he kept making deathbed confessions as he knew he didn’t have much time left. They were often about witnessing a murder and not telling anyone, but each time he confessed to us the details changed. It happened a couple of times a day over the course of his final week. We finally figured out that he would watch the local news and hear about these things happening then would think he had actually witnessed them.

astrobre

I didn’t see it, but my aunt watched her elderly mother fall down the stairs and confess just before she died that she wasn’t her biological mother. She told my aunt that her oldest sister was actually her mother. The sister had gotten pregnant too young and the mom said it was hers. A common way of handling it back then. She revealed it in her very last breath.

usf_edd