Extreme heat is broiling people in developing cities: New analysis finds the explosive growth of cities is helping drive dangerous conditions.

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The following submission statement was provided by /u/Vucea: — Extreme heat is exposing people in big cities to potentially deadly temperatures three times more often than it did in the 1980s, according to a new analysis. Much of that increase is concentrated in South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Though climate change is a factor, heat stress is being exacerbated by poverty and the explosive population growth of cities in parts of the developing world. The findings show policymakers need to adapt cities to extreme conditions, says Deepti Singh, a climate scientist at Washington State University, Vancouver, who studies heat waves and was not involved in the research. “Every single year we have so many deaths associated with extreme heat that to a large extent are avoidable.” Some parts of the globe are already crossing temperature and humidity thresholds that can kill people in hours. In coastal India, West Africa, and the Persian Gulf, for example, heat waves reach deadly conditions every year, on average. And the pain is increasingly felt in cities, where populations are growing and heat-absorbing concrete and pavement compounds the problem. — Please reply to OP’s comment here: /r/Futurology/comments/q7lfy1/extreme_heat_is_broiling_people_in_developing/hgjbv2k/

FuturologyBot

Extreme heat is exposing people in big cities to potentially deadly temperatures three times more often than it did in the 1980s, according to a new analysis. Much of that increase is concentrated in South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Though climate change is a factor, heat stress is being exacerbated by poverty and the explosive population growth of cities in parts of the developing world. The findings show policymakers need to adapt cities to extreme conditions, says Deepti Singh, a climate scientist at Washington State University, Vancouver, who studies heat waves and was not involved in the research. “Every single year we have so many deaths associated with extreme heat that to a large extent are avoidable.” Some parts of the globe are already crossing temperature and humidity thresholds that can kill people in hours. In coastal India, West Africa, and the Persian Gulf, for example, heat waves reach deadly conditions every year, on average. And the pain is increasingly felt in cities, where populations are growing and heat-absorbing concrete and pavement compounds the problem.

Vucea

Well this certainly doesn’t bode well for the future, does it?

VentralRaptor24

Getting air conditioning to poor countries should be considered a matter of life or death.

kernals12