Netflix Q1 EPS $3.53 vs. $2.89 Est.; Q1 Revs. $7.87B vs. $7.93B Est. Stock is down -20% AH

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They kept raising prices on me. I would’ve kept subscribing even though I hardly watched anything on it, but all those notices about higher pricing backfired as it finally caught my attention and I dumped them.

Weeks later, they sent me an email asking me to go back with a new, lower price offer. No thanks.

Sign-Tall

Probably cause they’ve diluted their shows with a ton of turds. Finding a good original is a 1/10 chance now and with rising prices and improving competitors, it’s much easier to just cancel and renew every once in a while to catch up on the 3 good shows you missed.

Plus their movies are the very definition of meh. Some ok ones but everything else is just so generic.

I’ve been spending more time watching HBO Max, Disney + and as crazy at it sounds Apple TV+ these days.

timeinthemarket

Now down 63% from ATH, crazy drop off

Squid_Contestant_69

Can we replace the N in FAANG with Nvidia?

MajesticNectarine

So Bill Ackman bought about 3.1 million Netflix shares for $1.1 billion back in January. That means his investment dropped about $250 million today. Ouch.

PrefersDigg

Fannie Mae forecasts U.S. economy to fall into modest recession next year

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A mild recession is better than this inflation spiraling out of control.

Chokolit

I feel like this whole thing is held together with scotch tape and popsicle sticks

TheWrightBros

Where in gods name am I supposed to put money other than I-bonds and Real Estate?

Ap3X_GunT3R

These analysts don’t know anything! I’ve been daytrading for …. *checks calendar* … six months!

^(/s)

th3cr1t1c

Thanks you JPow for postponing the recession. Now I need to find a buyer for my boredape.gif

Ec0n0mlst

Hot Economy, Rising Inflation: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

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The reason the Fed “thinks they can thread the needle” is because they cant say that this economy could use a mild recession and increased unemployment. I think that is the real goal – but cant be articulated.

TurtlePaul

>Post-pandemic Economy, Rising Inflation: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Pandemic Economy, Rising Deaths: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Trump Economy, Rising inequality: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>China-US trade war Economy, Rising tariffs: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Slow Obama Economy, Rising China: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Great Recession Economy, Rising bankruptcies: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>War Economy, Rising terrorism: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Bubble Tech Economy, Rising rates: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Asian Crisis Economy, Rising GDP and boners of Clinton: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>USSR Economy, Rising American dominance: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This

>Cold war economy, Rising rates, insane inflation, terrorism, Nixon water gate, Vietnam War, gold bubble, hippies not working, energy crisis:

>#*The Fed Has NEVER EVER EVER EVERRRRRR!!!!!!!!!#&!$!`(~)$!~)/(!!!!!! Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This*

Ok. Cool story.

zxc123zxc123

Well, this is inflation that’s of a different sort because of covid. I’m not sure we can make an apples to apples comparison.

TrashPanda_924

How will rising rates affect our ability to finance the national debt? I’m curious about this but admittedly understand little. But it seems like interest on the debt might become a problem if rates exceed 4% or so. How will we handle this? Will the Treasury just let the debt keep ballooning? Will the Fed have to buy up bonds (essentially printing money)? But that wouldn’t help them control inflation. If the debt reaches some unpayable number, will people just keep buying (they still pay interest on it after all), or could we see bondholders get nervous?

floof_overdrive

The government is praying that inflation will magically disappear. The government created it with the massive M2 spike and then the artificial supply constraints in response to Covid. They are pretending increasing the interest rate from 0.25 to 0.50 will do anything when inflation is above 10% (look up the pre-1990 formula for real inflation numbers). If the government is unwilling to control spending, then getting inflation under control with the interest rate requires a meteoric rise yesterday. This clearly won’t happen because voters will be unhappy and the horizon on the current ruling party is until the next election cycle.

Homeimprvrt

new US Gov I-bond interest rates for April 2022 – 9.62%

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>a very nice 9.62%

personally i don’t think it’s nice, i think it’s pretty scary.

dvanceBag

That is great, and I own two $10k ones, but you can’t invest enough to completely counter inflation so this is just a small tool to use to flight inflation.

across-the-board

Is there an “I-bond buying for dummies” faq out there that is good? Is it 10k per spouse?

4-me

I put some money in for the first time today which was at 7.12% like OP mentioned. The treasury direct site is so awful. I can’t believe I have to use a mouse to enter my password which is not case sensitive.

dayk995

That just means we lost 9.6% in purchasing power due to inflation. Nothing to celebrate about.

2tofu

Am I in an echo chamber or are index funds really the best?

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Index funds are the simple easiest way with less risk. Individual stock picking can yield tremendous gains but at the cost of time and risk.

funpolice99

The alternative to index funds is “I want more money than the overall market will produce in the aggregate, and I want it faster.”

But the caveat is that you need to add “I am willing to take the chance that I’ll pick the wrong investments and lose much more than the overall market, also losing valuable time in the process.”

Why search for the needle when you can buy the haystack?

BTW, Jack Bogle has passed away. He’s not trying to sell you index funds. His idea and the decades of investors who successfully followed it speak for themselves with results.

One way to entertain yourself is to keep the majority of your investments in index funds, and use a small amount to speculate. Even some Bogleheads will admit to doing that, and their community is indeed an echo chamber, however sonorous those echoes might be!

McKnuckle_Brewery

The two communities you outlined are pretty well aligned so “echo chamber” isn’t the worst way to put it, but in this case, the echoes tend to give pretty good advice!

Mandelbruh_Series

The Boglehead philosophy is entirely sound, and I would urge any young investor to adhere to it.

It’s not “too easy”, because it does require you to sit and wait quite a bit.

Your other course is you can try to outperform the market and fail.

AltoDomino79

You can do both. 70/90% index and the rest individual stocks.

Lower_Culture4596

Can someone in plain English explain the change in OTC that Vanguard sent me?

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Says you can’t buy or transfer in OTC securities anymore but you can continue to hold and sell the positions in these securities you already have.

Pretty clear.

YTChillVibesLofi

This is bad news for GBTC investors. I guess I’ll just hold mine or move to somewhere else. Ugh.

JustCommunication640

Just got this email Too and can’t figure out what holding it was

Mammoth_Apartment_70

I had one similar (Canada). I can still buy em but they have to be on a Canadian exchange as well. So I have some curlf stock, and now I just buy cura instead. If I call in, I can still purchase the American counterpart from the broker. It’s going to fuck my American pot companies though. Guess they will stay cheap longer and I can add more until they get full listing.

frech77

Yea it says get fidelity. & $NUGN

dumpface420

Can someone in plain English explain the change in OTC that Vanguard sent me?

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Says you can’t buy or transfer in OTC securities anymore but you can continue to hold and sell the positions in these securities you already have.

Pretty clear.

YTChillVibesLofi

This is bad news for GBTC investors. I guess I’ll just hold mine or move to somewhere else. Ugh.

JustCommunication640

Just got this email Too and can’t figure out what holding it was

Mammoth_Apartment_70

I had one similar (Canada). I can still buy em but they have to be on a Canadian exchange as well. So I have some curlf stock, and now I just buy cura instead. If I call in, I can still purchase the American counterpart from the broker. It’s going to fuck my American pot companies though. Guess they will stay cheap longer and I can add more until they get full listing.

frech77

Yea it says get fidelity. & $NUGN

dumpface420

Is it reasonable to expect S&P 500 ETF return rates to continue averaging ~10.5% in the future?

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Burry has predicted 10 of the last two recessions since then.

brianmcg321

Reasonable. Sure.

Guaranteed, not at all.

Nobody knows.

BruceBrave

Michael Burry has predicted a crash every week since he got lucky that one time. Wouldn’t put much thought into anything he says. He’s the boomer equivalent of a you tube influencer. Doesn’t mean it won’t happen, but it certainly hasn’t happened the last 1000 times he predicted.

But no, it would not be reasonable to expect S&P to return 10.5% a year.

Eisernes

Nominal? Absolutely. Real? Probably closer to 7.

FreeRadical5

Averaging? Yes, but that could still include a -30% crash year or something to that effect.

leaning_on_a_wheel

i started investing with little money.

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Of course it’s worth it! Keep going and don’t stop. You’ll have more money in 20 years then you think you will by doing this.

zonestarx

Do you plan on being alive in 15-20 years? If yes, then it doesn’t matter if you can only invest a little bit right now, because in 20 years you’d rather have something than nothing.

Read “The Simple Path to Wealth” by J L Collins. Don’t get convinced by youtube charlatans that you need to invest in riskier things because with your small amount you’ll never make it otherwise. You CAN get rich slowly and steadily over time, don’t get blinded by greed.

Good luck bud, in 20 years you’ll be very happy your young dumb self was smart enough to put $50/month away.

CommittedToLearning

Chap I literally started doing that this month with exactly the same values and I’m 35.

Ghoulsverne_x1

$500 + $50/month for 20 years = $12,500

$500 + $50/month for 20 years, compounded at 7% average historical returns of stock market = $28,000

Which one do you prefer?

dubov

Play around with an Investment calculator.
Start amount $500
8% return rate annually
Additional contribution $50 monthly.

10 years – $10,085.68 age 35
15 years – $18,466.40 age 40
20 years – $30,780.43 age 45
30 years – $75, 458.86 age 55
40 years – $171,916.23 age 65 retirement.

Now imagine if you earn enough money to put away $50-$100 a week vs $50 a month.. any additional money put in and given enough time will make you a millionaire.

TylerH8sYou

Is P/E ratio still a good indicator for deciding which stocks to invest in?

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On its own P/E tells you precious little. A growth company can have an absurdely high PE and still be a bargain (most huge companies today like Apple, Amazon or Facebook did at some point have such high P/E figures).

A low P/E can mean that the company is a bargain, is just chugging along without any prospects to go up or down, or people have lost confidence and is likely to fold soon. Take your pick.

iqisoverrated

Not if you just look at the PE on Yahoo it isn’t.

Let’s take Disney as an example since you brought it up, its net earnings last year was 2 billion dollars giving it a PE of 77, is that a normal earnings? no it is not, due to covid it had to shut down its parks.

So let’s look back at 2019 what did it earn back then pre covid with everything opened up and running? It earned around 11 billion.

Will it earn that again, oh most definitely IMHO. With 11 billion earnings its PE ratio is only 14. That is a nice healthy PE ratio.

That is a more realistic current PE number adjusted for non-recurring expenses.

My point is you have to ignore non-recurring events. The only way to do that is to look at past history and the annual report.

Sorting out companies with low PE on a website is completely worthless. You could get an extremely low PE if, for example, the company make some money selling part of the company. But this is a one-time event don’t let the one-time events fool you.

Disney in my book is a buy right now IMHO.

Kimbra12

I think they can be useful when comparing businesses in the same industry.

guachi01

It’s far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price.

YTChillVibesLofi

It’s absolutely 100% useless on it’s own. A stock could technically have 1000 PE and be a good investment, or 1 PE and be 100% guaranteed to lose you all your money.

Gnax